Naturalization and Good Moral Character

Recorded Date: 
05/23/2013
Recorded Length: 
90 minutes

This webinar covers various topics of good moral character. We will discuss discretionary and statutory bars to proving good moral character and the balance test that CIS must employ when deciding if an applicant who is not statutorily ineligible has good moral character. In this discussion, we will cover how failure to register for the selective service, failure to pay child support, failure to file income taxes, DUIs and other issues affect one’s naturalization application. This webinar is appropriate for practitioners who are new to naturalization, as well as those who are experienced and need a review or fine-tuning.

Presenters:

Eric Cohen, Executive Director – Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC)
Eric has been with the ILRC since 1988 and has extensive experience training attorneys, paralegals, community advocates, and organizers on a variety of immigration law, immigrants’ rights, and leadership development topics.  Eric is a national expert on naturalization and citizenship law and is the primary author of the ILRC’s manual entitled, Naturalization and U.S. Citizenship: The Essential Legal Guide for Legal Practitioners.  Eric has served as a liaison between community groups and CIS (Citizenship and Immigration Services) officials for the San Francisco Bay Area since 1994.  Additionally, Eric helped develop ILRC's community model for effectively processing naturalization applications in groups and trained both legal workers and lay advocates in the Bay Area and Los Angeles, and works with community organizers and others on voter education for naturalized citizens.  Prior to working at the ILRC, Eric worked with the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, Labor Immigrant Assistance Project where he worked on legalization and union organizing campaigns.  He is conversant in Spanish.

Erin Quinn, Staff Attorney – Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC)
Erin brings to ILRC over 8 years of experience as an immigration defense attorney and holds a joint degree in law and public policy (JD/MPP) from the University of Michigan. Prior to opening her own practice in 2007, Ms. Quinn represented immigrants as an associate at the Law Office of Robert B. Jobe. Her experience in immigration law and policy includes working as a fellow for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, EU headquarters in Belgium; clerking for the Immigration Court of San Francisco; and guest lecturer at CSU Eastbay.